UK theme parks from another point of view!

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rita's girl
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Wed Apr 15, 2009 9:32 am

quote="Gemzie121"]Nikkisun, thats not on! you're only really supposed to have one carer, a maximum of 2! I fail to see how this was allowed, and would have complained! I have a severely disabled friend but she can manage with 2 carers, I cant see how 9 are needed! Its people like that who give us a bad name! Im going the week after next in a group of 5 for my birthday, 2 of us being disabled, im prepared that we will have to split up into 2groups and wait for a short period after the 1st group has been on as its only fair, how people can get away with going on as a group of 9 in one go is ridiculous! I accept i wont be able to go on with my disabled friend because im disabled too, and that it'll always just be me and one of my friends as a carer and that we wont all get to go on anything together, birthday outing or not. Its the rules, and so annoying when others twist round them, one rule for one person and another for someone else, they need to be more consistent! then people would have no reason to complain! i bet we wont be allowed to do the same (not that we'd even try it!) but still!

I can see why people get so wound up now, that is what id define as taking the michael. Did you complain Nikkisun? i would have! :)

EDIT: And how on earth did they think putting the other carers in other cars would have made any difference in an evacuation anyway?! thats just stupid! My friend got on spinball once & then decided she was getting off, my brother who was her carer was made to get off too, i just think its crazy how they change the rules all the time! argh![/quote]


9 CARERS?
Guest services dont allow more than 4 carers, my son and husband are carers too because i dont do air, ripsaw, or spinball so they take my son on. I have never seend more the 4 go on a ride but 9 is takin the mickey.

"aly" wrote:
This is the thing though there so many things you can be classed as being disabled for. Being too short and too tall as an example.

My mate is classed as disabled as he has MS, but when he goes to a theme park he joins the queue like everyone else.

It's the whole point of where do you draw the line though. :?

Generally though, unless they are in a wheelchair to be honest I strugle too see why someone should get to skip the queue, after all if someone is unable to queue you need to question why they are at the park.



There are 69% of disabled people who are NOT in wheelchairs so how can you draw a line. There are experts who work for the Government who look at your claim for disability, write to doctors, make judgements then decide on the level of disability you have. But they make these decisions on facts and not fiction.

I went to the Towers yesterday and to be honest I nearly punched one of the sky ride operators in the face, (tbh the thought of loosing my door licence stopped me)

We were at forbidden valley going on the sky ride towards CATCF the queue line was huge and my son was havin quite a bad day. So we went to the disabled entry bit (the exit from enterance) the woman on the skyride (*with attitude*) asked why we were in that queue. My son showed her the band, and said there were 5 of us and she replied "I DON'T CARE YOU HAVE TO BE IN A WHEELCHAIR TO BE DISABLED" Omg I nearly hit the F****** roof i was so mad, How on earth can one person make a comment like that.

Anyway I went to Guest Services where I demanded to see a manager. I said everything that I have written above and he replied with 3 stages.

A) She has no right to question/comment on why you have the bands
B) We (guest services) determine who is to wear bands dependant on the proof that is provided, we dont take doctors notes any more because people forge them, We only accept blue badges and DWP letters ( or items of a similar nature)
C) She wont be working for us tomorrow.! She has broke the code of AT
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Wed Apr 15, 2009 9:51 am

^^^ That is APPALLING! I'm sorry, but you DON'T have to be in a wheelchair to be registered disabled. You wouldn't know I was by just looking at me. Ask me to do the numberplate test for a driving licence and I'm stuck though!

Now I have used this system before, after I learned I was in fact entitled to do so. I struggle with steps where there aren't edge markings, as there aren't on most rides, and so I will use the exits where I can. I don't take the mick though, if there's like 10 of us on a trip I won't, I'll just hope I don't trip.The trick floor on Duel can sometimes catch me out, it depends how my eyes have been before the tip if I use the bands. I don't see why I need to justify myself further than that (I've got a DWP letter, so I am entitled).

I don't mind if your disability is hidden or visible, as long as you don't abuse the system by taking 9 carers on and getting re-rides etc. The ONLY times I've ever gotten a re-ride was when I was with my friend Helena, who uses a wheelchair, it was on Duel and the staff asked us.
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Wed Apr 15, 2009 11:37 am

The only ride we get a reride on is rapids. The staff told u due to the complex walk to the exit it entitles us to do so if we wish. Yesterday we did go for the re ride and it caused uproar from the queue line, and quite rightly so.

it is the only ride where we have done so. We were there at half 9 yesterday and left after 5, we only done:

nemmy x2
ripsaw x 2
air
oblivion
rita
rapids
log flume
runaway mine train
and battle galleons

so it shows that i dont take the mick with the band system although there are others that give us a bad name.
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Thu Apr 23, 2009 2:34 pm

The whole problem with disabled people at Alton is that they get a free fastrack ticket all day for all rides - something which is priceless. The Fastrack Platinum doesn't even cover all the rides!

The law needs to be changed. Someone who is deaf is classed as disabled. That's okay, I have no problem with that. However, why does this stop them queuing? It doesn't, surely?

This is where ONLY people with mobility problems should be entitled to the bands. This way, the disabled queue will not be longer than the usual queue and people in the normal queue will be happier as they will not be waiting as long.

I have a feeling Chessington have changed their policy to make it super strict, perhaps something similar to the above (as in, only people who have mobility problems get the wristbands).

ADHD is a fairly new diagnosis which i have my own theory about.
When I was a young lad, I had my imagination, played on the green round the corner, took my bike out and was very much an outdoor, treehouse, bike riding, adventure filled person.
These days, with the introduction of computers and more kids having TVs in their rooms (i didn't get one till I was at least 16!), then it is almost like the kids of today NEED entertainment ALL the time. Hence, anything which isn't moving around or flashing then it is boring, so the child gets distracted.
While I am no way qualified to give any such suggestion, it seems more true than not, matching up how the world has changed.

Surely the biggest thing to remember is that Alton aren't required by law to do anything like the wristbands for disabled people. While the law states you must make reasonable adjustments to aid people with a disability, changing the whole queuing system on some of the older rides isn't reasonable. Digging up the gardens to make them step-free isn't reasonable either.

The reason Alton have this whole system is because wheelchair users won't be able to get their chair round some of the corners in some of the queuelines. However, Alton can't discriminate between disabilities, so it's all or none. Due to the corner issue, it has to be all.

Saying that, if Chessington have been successfull in creating this super strict new system, then expect it to be at Alton next season. While they may get a lot of flack from people who used to use the system, overall, it will be a much fairer system to guests who are not disabled.

I feel sorry for ride op's though. They risk upsetting disabled people by saying they're not allowed back on and then have the carers shouting at them, or upset the first 20 people in the normal queue by letting them re-ride. It's not an easy option.


On a side note, surely I am being discriminated against at the supermarket. . . because I am NOT disabled, then I am NOT allowed to park close to the entrance. That's not right, surely? :P

---- Post Info Added ----

"Voni86" wrote:
My only problem with this is that they don't ALWAYS check it. I went to the park last summer after sustaining an injury that meant I couldn't walk. I tried to do the park on crutches but it was a nightmare, so we went back to customer services and they let me rent a wheelchair and gave my group the wristbands, without checking anything. Granted, I was on crutches and it was pretty obvious I couldn't walk, but if they'd let me get away with it, what's to say they wouldn't let a perfectly healthy person get away with it? Especially in light of the 'disability for at least a year' rule that was noted a few pages back.

Travellers do this at Easter.

The problem though is people. I witnessed some woman having a go at the poor girl behind the desk because she asked to see documentation. Even though the person was in a wheelchair, they could have got up and walked as soon as they were out of the office. Some people get offended, some people do not.
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Thu Apr 23, 2009 3:21 pm

Chessington HAVEN'T been successful though. I know of several people with things like autism and global development delay who've been refused, and these are both registered as disabilities.

And as for changing the law, the law isn't the problem, it's those few disabled people who abuse the system that give the rest of us a bad name.
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Thu Apr 23, 2009 5:19 pm

I'm going to feel terrible when I book my disabled ticket now! Although to be fair, I DO actually plan on queuing in the lines, regardless if I have a carer (parental, yuss) or not. There's nothing wrong with my legs at all, so I really don't understand other people in the same boat as me completely abusing the rules. It's not on! [-X
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Thu Apr 23, 2009 5:31 pm

Hello everyone,

Been a pretty quiet member on here for quite a long time, but this discussion has really had me engrossed, so I thought I would come out of the woodwork and share my opinions...

Although I do understand that disabled people should all be treated the same, I do feel that it is highly unfair that people who are very much capable of walking and queueing, such as deaf people or those suffering from ADHD, are still entitled to wristbands who skip the queue.

I am fully behind allowing access to rides for those who physically are incapable of queueing, but should they really get to jump straight on a ride in 5 minutes when the queue length is over an hours? No way... Surely they could come up withsome kind of swipe card system, whereby they can scan their card at the rides entrance which will automatically generate a time for them to be able to enter the disabled entrance (allowing perhaps 5-10mins additional time for the disabled queue to go down and for them to be seated on the ride). This would bring their time in line with those in the queue, and would make the whole queueing system much fairer for all.. abled and disabled alton towers guests alike. I also feel that once you have scanned your pass, you should not be able to scan it on another ride until you have been on the first, otherwise you would be able to scan for say, nemesis with an hours queue, then air with an hour and 10 minutes queue and be able to go on them 10 minutes apart.

Access should definitely be made easier for those who are non capable of walking or standing in a queue, but they should not be able to simply walk on a ride. And those who have disabilities which mean they are able to queue, should do so, instead of taking advantage oh a chance to skip the queues.

Also a quick question for those who say that their child or friend has ADHD and so cannot queue for say 45minutes on nemesis as they will get bored, how do they manage the car journey to alton towers? Surely if it is just a question of them becoming easily distracted and or irritable, then this is no reason they cannot queue? If i have to queue for 45 mins for nemesis in the heat of the summer then I will definitely become bored and irritable, but this does not mean I should be able to skip the queue. Also, how is ADHD diagnosed? It is to do with something in the brain that means you are incapable of concentrating, or do they just look at a child who is easily distracted and gets irritable doing the same tasks... becuase surely this could be applied to anybody... with no accurate way to diagnose those who have ADHD and those who just dont want to concentrate and like to be disruptive?

I really REALLY hope I am not offending anyone, I would just like some clairty on ADHD as I dont know much about it and find it quite an interesting topic!

Thanks for putting up with my long post, well done if you have made it this far.. and hello to all! Its nice to be actually posting on here, as opposed to just reading all of your posts :)
 
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Sat Apr 25, 2009 10:10 pm

ADHD and autism are both exasperated by stressful situations, and if crowds happen to be one of those triggers, the person with the condition will not cope, and whatever coping mechanism they do have (be it crying, screaming, etc) will kick in. It's not controllable by them like it is for us, and they find the concepts of queuing etc hard to grasp. This is my interpretation from those I know, so please correct me if I'm wrong.
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Sun Apr 26, 2009 9:39 am

I understand from what you are saying that they have no control on their emoitions in situations that they may find stressfuk such as queueing, and this can lead to crying or shouting, but I really dont want to seem like a horrible person, but this to me does not really constitute a reason why they should not have to queue.

I really hope I am not being offensive, I have never met anyone with ADHD and If I ever meet anyone with ADHD I may find that I do a 180 on my opinions but with disabilities such as ADHD and ME I do wonder if these are a product of modern society. They are disabilities whereby there is no set model of symptoms, no genetic form of testing (as far as I am aware0 and no way to get a definite diagnosis. These disabilities were not around 100 years ago, back then these people would have been described as sleepy/lazy and hyperctive or disruptive. I just feel like society feels it has to create ilnesses and disabilities in order to justify symptoms nowadays.
Someone can no longer just be disruptive, they have ADHD and people cant just be people who get tired easily or are a bit lazy, they are now classed as having ME.

Once again i'd like to reiterate that I do not wish to offend anyone in any way, these are just my personal opinions, and I welcome responses. As I feel a well debated discussion allows everyone to learn a lot more!

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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Sun Apr 26, 2009 7:59 pm

My view is


If you're in a wheel chair for a real reason not just a sprained leg...

then yes, use the exit/disabled que


if you have mental problem that could cause problems with other guests in the que, then yes.

anything else, get queuing.

broken legs/crutches/broken arms are not an excuse!


Iv worked at the towers, had many arguments with many people who claim to be "disabled" and there not, makes my blood boil how people can abuse such a system

and the re-rides thing is just a joke.


alton need to get there thinking caps on(if they have anyone with enough brain power to reliase there is a problem) and sort it out.
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Sun Apr 26, 2009 9:55 pm

I think this issue taps into a much greater one we face in a modern society. However, you cannot complicate the matter to it's why and whyfores, sometimes you just have to carry on with the system that works for the majority. Yes, the system may get abused and yes, some people may think that it's unfair, but you could say people abuse the normal queueing system, jumping fences and whatnot.

Think of it this way. Guest "A" had a party last night and she came to Alton Towers the next day. Her feet are sore and queueing is uncomfortable.

Guest "B" had a party last night and he also came to Alton Towers the next day. His feet are sore while queueing, but he takes note that this seems to happen fairly regularly. His feet may be quite tender.

Guest "C" didn't go to a party but finds it uncomfortable queueing anyway and thinks her feet are fairly weak.

Guest "D"'s feet ache fairly regularly and she's seen a doctor about it previously who said he should take the weight off his feet regularly whilst out.

Guest "E" has a disabled pass.

Now that's just one example. How something is a symptom to the point where people think a "condition" is warranted. I don't mean that too harshly, but it's hard to draw the line and doing so can bring about much "Alton don't treat us fair blah blah blah" and for the relatively small number of guests it concerns, it's easier to let them all pass.

So long as they don't reride.
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Sun Apr 26, 2009 10:06 pm

"Jon" wrote:
I think this issue taps into a much greater one we face in a modern society. However, you cannot complicate the matter to it's why and whyfores, sometimes you just have to carry on with the system that works for the majority. Yes, the system may get abused and yes, some people may think that it's unfair, but you could say people abuse the normal queueing system, jumping fences and whatnot.

Think of it this way. Guest "A" had a party last night and she came to Alton Towers the next day. Her feet are sore and queueing is uncomfortable.

Guest "B" had a party last night and he also came to Alton Towers the next day. His feet are sore while queueing, but he takes note that this seems to happen fairly regularly. His feet may be quite tender.

Guest "C" didn't go to a party but finds it uncomfortable queueing anyway and thinks her feet are fairly weak.

Guest "D"'s feet ache fairly regularly and she's seen a doctor about it previously who said he should take the weight off his feet regularly whilst out.

Guest "E" has a disabled pass.

Now that's just one example. How something is a symptom to the point where people think a "condition" is warranted. I don't mean that too harshly, but it's hard to draw the line and doing so can bring about much "Alton don't treat us fair blah blah blah" and for the relatively small number of guests it concerns, it's easier to let them all pass.

So long as they don't reride.




Nail on the head, sir.
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Mon Apr 27, 2009 12:48 pm

For those who are not familiar with ADHD, it is basically called "Naughty Child Syndrome" by many people.

There are different stages/strenghts of ADHD rating from just hyper, to being extremly violent.

My son was 6mths old when I noticed a few differences from other children, so I contacted my health visitor who said it was in my head. Over a period of 5 years people were trying to find out what was wrong with him and there were tests, scans basically everything possible. We as parents tried all ideas the professionals were throwing at us as I believe that medication has to be on a last resort basis.

There was one particular incident where he managed to get out of my grip when getting ready to cross the road and he ran across in front of a car, pulled a little girls hair for no reason, kicked a man, and then hit 3 teachers, got excluded all in one day. Thats when people started to tell me that their diagnosis would be confirmed he has adhd. It was not just that incident but that was a bad day and it contributed to proving he has a problem.

As a parent I have tried everything possible to combat this. He was diagnosed and put on ritalin last year and omg it has made such a difference. However I still have problems with him and I still have to be careful. I am a door supervisor and sometimes have to get in confrontational situations where I am against blokes who are huge but I can deal with them, However when Haydn is on a mega kick off it takes 3 of us to restrain him. Its a bit like an incredable hulk syndrome.#

As you can imagine when he does flair up its hard, especially at a place like Alton Towers. Should he kick off in a que line what would I do? I would have parents scowling at me, chavs laughing at me, I have had chavs filming him whilst kicking off. Can you imagine how that makes me. Bleedin Angry and savage is what.

In november we werre on a car ride in Magic Kingdom in Disney, Haydn had a kick off while we were on the ride. He was punching me, kicking me, poking me in the eyes, swearing and I was stuck in the car. My husband had to jump out of the car behind me to help me carry him out of the way. People were laughing at us which upsets me and him making the situation worse, because he kicks off more because he cannot control his emotions, and me ready to get angry because im trying to protect him.

Unless you/or someone you know is in a situation where they need assistance then tbh I dont think you can really judge the situation. Apart from wearing a board around your neck stating your disability no one can tell some people are in need.

On the other hand I can see peoples views and I do understand and I am sorry that this is an issue which causes ill feeling towards each other.

If I could buy a pill that would stop my little one from having this I would in a flash but unfortunatly I can't and I cant predict his moods. BUT I do not take the mick in terms of ride counts like some others do.
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Mon Apr 27, 2009 3:45 pm

^Yep. Minor_Furie was under diagnosis for about seven years - similar issues. He was statemented, but never fully diagnosed. The specialist he was under could only ever observe just shy the amount of issues required to make a true diagnosis.

It was the same though - the sudden, violent outbursts. Kicking and screaming, inability to listen and follow reason, etc.

Fortunately, Minor_Furie doesn't have it bad. Over about five years, it settled and calmed (with just occasional outbursts (shaking, stammering, clear frustration at himself)). He's still not 100%, you can see on occasion where his head isn't quite functioning correctly, but it's very manageable and he's getting on fine.

The first few years were a real struggle though, it was a nightmare taking him anywhere, and doing anything that put him in a stressful situation.

I'd certainly not want to have to deal with a child who was worse (so kudos for coping and getting about).

As for the policy.

Essentially, the issue would be easily resolved using the same system Thorpe have. For the rides which get big queues, you go through the disabled access, and the ride op writes the time you came on the ride, and the current queue length.

You then can't use that pass again until after the amount of time you should have queued. You still have the same opportunities as everyone else, but without the need to queue. In the mean time, you can spend the potential queue time doing whatever.

However, quick morality question for you. I went with a disabled lad I knew from uni. Whatever the disease was caused the disability (his legs were useless and he was wheelchair bound) meant that he would end up not living much beyond 20.

So, if you knew somebody only had until they were 20 to enjoy life, would you begrudge them a few extra goes on a ride in front of you (in reality, this would be a few extra goes in your entire time visiting Alton Towers)?

Obviously not everyone has such a problem, but just a quick moral question...
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Mon Apr 27, 2009 6:38 pm

Here's one too shake up them books:

Guests who are liable to experience violent tendancies may not ride most of the rides for health and safety reasons. (Which is anything from being stuck in/on a ride to evacuations from a ride that can put themselves and others in danger). Therefore how does a Ride attendant identify this when everyone who is classed as disabled is issued with the same coloured bands?
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Sat May 02, 2009 6:53 pm

"stokywolf" wrote:
Here's one too shake up them books:

Guests who are liable to experience violent tendancies may not ride most of the rides for health and safety reasons. (Which is anything from being stuck in/on a ride to evacuations from a ride that can put themselves and others in danger). Therefore how does a Ride attendant identify this when everyone who is classed as disabled is issued with the same coloured bands?


I wasn't aware that people with "violent tendencies" couldn't ride the rides? It would be impossible to enforce to, not all people with problems like that would get the wristbands anyway. Seems very unlikely this is an issue.

Plus, Guest Services have the right to turn people away when they are getting the wristbands if they feel that a person cannot ride due to their problems. Same with the Ride Ops if theres an obvious reason why it wouldn't be safe for a person to ride.
 
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Wed May 06, 2009 11:38 am

We were told on Monday that we should contact Alton in the future with regards disabled policy.

Apparently Merlin are looking at implementing a standard "Merlin" approach. Alton is really the odd one out at the moment.

Management at Alton are currently talking with Merlin to work out how best to sort out the same policy they have at Chessington and Legoland. Both require written documentation to support a disabled claim.

Just a quick heads up for people who use the disabled bands - get in touch first!
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Wed May 06, 2009 4:06 pm

"furie" wrote:
We were told on Monday that we should contact Alton in the future with regards disabled policy.

Apparently Merlin are looking at implementing a standard "Merlin" approach. Alton is really the odd one out at the moment.

Management at Alton are currently talking with Merlin to work out how best to sort out the same policy they have at Chessington and Legoland. Both require written documentation to support a disabled claim.

Just a quick heads up for people who use the disabled bands - get in touch first!


Why, what would change? Just the type of documentation you need? What if your already on the system?
 
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Wed May 06, 2009 4:27 pm

They couldn't tell us very much, but it was clear there was a major change coming.

Chessington and Legoland require proof from a doctor. Don't ask me what, I don't know! I just know that whatever kind of documentation you would require to get disability, a disabled car parking badge or a statement for the education system is required now at Chessington and Legoland.

They have a different policy for queueing, where you need a second exemption from doing queues where they are wheelchair friendly. I think they suggest a wheelchair for those who cannot stand for long periods.

I dug out a lot of information on CF - Two secs:

"Chessington WOA Disability Rule" wrote:
Dear Guest

Our disabled policy is offered to assist those that are unable to queue in the main queue line, providing them with alternative access point to allow easier access to rides wherever possible.

The policy has now become widely used by guests for whom the service is not a necessity and subsequently, those guests that require this policy as a priority, have not been receiving the assistance as it was intended.

It is with this in mind that the disabled ride access policy has been reviewed and ammended. Effective of March 2009, those guest that are physically anable to queue or stand for sustained periods of time, those that are unable to access the main queue line and those that mentally do not understand the concept of queueing, will be the only guests that we will provide with the ride access policy and wristband at Chessington World of Adventures and Zoo.

All guests will be required to re-register with Guest Services in Market Square and provide photographic identification along with either: a letter from own doctor or consultant clearly stating why the guest is unable to queue or photographic identification issued by registered organisation or charity that states what the disability is.

Guest services reserves the right to make decision based on requirement for this service on for health and saftey reasons.

Photographic identification will be required to be presented to Guest Services on all subsequent visits or guests will not be provided with Ride Access Pass and wristband.

Guest Services will be avaliable to offer assistance to all disabled guests with ride seftey and general park access information.

We do hope you understand that these changes are to improve the service provided to those
guests for which this provides a safe and magical day out.

Yours sincerely

Guest Services Team
Chessington World of Adventures and Zoo.


Legoland (be prepared, this one is heavily detailed and well thought out)
"Legoland disabled policy" wrote:
Facilities and Services


- Car park for guests with disabilities is situated near the entrance, follow the signs to the Disabled Car Park.
- Free admission for registered personal assistants with documented proof of disability. The personal assistant is to help the Guest with disabilities to maximise their day, especially while waiting for the rides and attractions. If there are other members of the party that require accompaniment such as children under the height restrictions we recommend an additional adult visits the park. Documentation is required and some questions will be asked to understand your individual requirements and enable us to advise you on how to make the most of your day. Please be advised we will not judge people on their physical appearance and so do require documentation for all disabilities.
- All ticket booths have induction loops, please look for the signs and adjust the hearing implement accordingly. Copies of the Guide for Guests with Disabilities are available from the ticket booths.
- Guests in wheelchairs can enter the turnstiles through one of two gates at either end of the turnstiles. Please ask a member of staff for assistance if required.
- Accessible toilets throughout the park. Each toilet has an alarm cord that can be activated in an emergency.
- Fully accessible restaurants and shops, please ask a member of staff for assistance if required. There are specific wheelchair areas at each show venue. Please make yourself known to the ushers at each show. These areas are on a first come first served basis. The view may be restricted. We suggest to arrive at least 15 minutes prior to the show starting.
- First Aid facilities are available throughout the park and medication/treatment rooms are located in LEGO® City
- Manual wheelchair hire is available on a first-come first-served basis from outside The LEGO Big Shop, just inside the turnstiles. A returnable deposit is required. We regret that wheelchairs hired from LEGOLAND cannot be taken past the turnstiles into the car parks.
- At the current time we do not have electric wheelchairs. As LEGOLAND is situated on a steep hill we recommend that users of mobility scooters or electric wheelchairs take care and drive with caution. The majority of queue lines can accommodate a mobility scooter. If you have any concerns using such a vehicle around the park please visit Guest Services on the day of your visit.
- Assistance dogs are welcome in to the park, however, dogs will not be able to accompany guests onto the rides. Please ensure the dog is left with another member of your group and not left unattended.

Rides and Attractions


- Ride restrictions are based on the containment of the ride, the force of the ride and the method of evacuation. These are set with the advice of external Ride Inspectors and exceptions will not be made.
- Some rides require either upper or lower body control:
Upper body control – requires the rider to be able to support / brace themselves in case of sudden change of direction, hold onto the restraints during the ride or evacuation.
Lower body control – requires the rider to be able to support themselves and walk unaided over a certain distance.
For further assistance please contact the Attractions Duty Manager or Guest Services on the day of your visit for full details on the ride or evacuation procedure.

- Wheelchair users may remain within their chair on the following rides and attractions: Aero Nomad, Orient Expedition, Digger Challenge, Hill Train, Enchanted Forest, Rat Trap, Loki’s Labyrinth and X-Box Zone.
- Many rides and attractions are accessible to wheelchair users via entrance lines. The following rides must be entered via the exit by wheelchair users: Jungle Coaster, Sky Rider, Extreme Team Challenge, DUPLO® Train, Boating School, Laser Raiders, The Dragon, Dragon’s Apprentice and Vikings' River Splash. Please note, guests wishing to ride the Vikings’ River Splash require upper body control and there is a hoist to lower Guests into the boat. If the hoist is experiencing technical difficulties or is unavailable Guests will also require lower body control. This is due to the complicated nature of the ride evacuation.
- Please be advised due to the nature of the attraction Exit Passes are not valid on Rocket Racers.

Exit Pass Policy



Aim - To ensure all of our Guests have the opportunity to experience our rides and attractions, within a safe and secure environment.

Background - LEGOLAND Windsor has been specifically designed to be accessible for Guests with disabilities. A wheelchair can be used in the majority of queue lines, and where this is not possible there is a ramp on exit or lifts for entry. All restaurants and shops are accessible and all shows are fully accessible to all Guests. In view of this level of accessibility it is not a legal requirement to offer an exit pass scheme for all Guests with disabilities.

LEGOLAND Windsor welcomes visits by people with disabilities and will do all that is possible to ensure a safe and pleasurable visit. However, certain rides and attractions can be physically demanding and vigorous. LEGOLAND Windsor therefore reserves the right to refuse admission to certain rides should it be felt there is a danger to a particular individual for whatever reason.

LEGOLAND Windsor has been advised by the Health and Safety Executive that refusal on the grounds of health and safety does not constitute discrimination. LEGOLAND Windsor hopes this is understood and Guests accept the decision made in the interest of the safety of all Guests. The exit pass scheme that is available is offered as a concession to those who require additional assistance and is an additional service to Guests.

This policy outlines the LEGOLAND Windsor Exit Pass Policy and is in conjunction with the Guide for Guests with Disabilities. The exits of the rides and attractions are also used by Guests who have purchased Q-bots, which allow the holder to virtually queue for a ride. Please be patient as there may be a short wait to board the ride.

The Scheme - In order to ascertain whether the exit pass is required for each individual Guest, a series of questions will be asked in order to determine their specific needs. The issuance of exit passes is based upon documentary proof of disability (Blue or orange badges will not be accepted as this does not state the nature of the disability). Examples of documentation required are: GP’s letter, Association Membership details, Council run membership, or any other form that states the disability.

Guests who require a wheelchair will not receive an exit pass as all queue lines, except those mentioned below, are accessible via the main entry to each attraction. Due to the following ride queue lines having steps in the main entrance access can be gained by going through the exit of the ride, this does not require an exit pass: Jungle Coaster, Sky Rider, Extreme Team Challenge, DUPLO Train, Boating School, Laser Raiders, Dragon Coaster and Dragon’s Apprentice. It is not recommended for Guests with disabilities relating to the heart, the spine, the neck, the bladder or broken limbs to ride the majority of the rides or attractions, and therefore an exit pass will not be issued in these cases.


As a visit to the Park requires a great deal of walking it is advised that Guests with mobility problems hire a wheelchair to be able to get around the park with ease.

LEGOLAND Windsor’s exit pass policy has been designed to assist Guests’ who do not understand the concept of queuing, have difficulties with everyday social interaction, have a limited capacity to follow instruction or to understand others emotional feelings or expressions, and may become agitated or distressed having to wait for periods of time. The scheme is in place to assist families to enjoy their day in the maximum way and to relieve pressure on the family. For specific disabilities this policy applies to, please enquire at Guest Services or send an email in advance to [email protected].

Regardless of the disability all height, age and weight restrictions will be enforced prior to boarding of the ride/attraction, exceptions on the grounds of a disability will not be made. Before entering the ride at the exit Guests must check the ride restriction board at the entrance to the ride. If a Guest is required to be lifted into / or from a ride unit their personal assistants must be able to fulfil this role. LEGOLAND team members may offer advice, but for the safety of all concerned will not assist with lifting.

The Process - Guests who qualify for the exit pass scheme must go to Guest Services, either at the Beginning or in LEGO City, with some form of identification relating to their disability. For Guests with Annual Passes a note can be made on their records to reduce the need for ID on every visit. Guests with out the relevant documentation will not be issued with an exit pass.

The person who has the disability receives a red hand stamp and the rest of their party receives a black hand stamp. At the attraction the red hand stamped person and up to three black hand stamped people may use the exit of the ride. Guests at the exit may have to wait for a short time to board the attraction.

Parties of greater than four must rotate to accompany the guest with a red hand stamp and may only revisit the same attraction after one hour.
Guests with black hand stamps may only use the exit of a ride when accompanied by a red hand stamped person. The aim of the scheme is for the red hand stamped person to get maximum enjoyment from their day.
At least one Guest with a black hand stamp must sit in the same carriage, boat, seat or row as the red hand stamped person.

LEGOLAND Windsor does not conform with other theme parks within the Merlin Entertainments Group as each Park has different facilities and services. If you receive an exit pass or equivalent at other Merlin Entertainments Group theme parks you may not receive one at LEGOLAND Windsor Park.

It is appreciated that some Guests require additional assistance to ensure they can maximise their enjoyment. LEGOLAND Windsor welcomes all feedback, both positive and negative, and will, where possible, implement suggestions, comments, and solutions made by our Guests. Feedback is important to the continuation of the development of our service for all of our Guests.


As I say, Alton aren't rushing into this - it's very complicated and what works for a small park like Legoland and Chessington is perhaps not 100% suitable for Alton. However, you'll see both require "documentation" to receive the exit pass and you will need to re-register with them on your first visit.

Some info I got from "on the ground" was on a forum for disabled people going to theme parks. Just general chit-chat, but the above are the official rules, and you'll have to talk to the Guest Services to get the exact low down.

I know reading the fine print is a swine, sorry it's a bit text heavy.
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Re: Queue policy for disabled guests

Wed May 06, 2009 4:38 pm

Thanks for posting all that! Eeeeeek, it's all very confusing!

I have a trip on the 26th of May...If I went without this new documentation then would they not allow me to get the bands do you think. :? (I'm already registered.) Seems a bit of a farce to be honest! But I know it's to stop abuse of the system...

One of the problems with AT is that most of the queues are not Wheelchair accessible at all...So they couldn't to what Legoland do, for example.
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