UK theme parks from another point of view!

 
evil cod

The Paper Rack - Current news articles

Mon Jun 30, 2008 6:05 pm

Want to expand the knowledge of your fellow members?

If you have a news article (non-Theme Park related) you think members of the forum may be interested in or should read then this topic is the place to post it!

Any topics that are seen to take off well will be split into their own topic, so if a post you made appears to have vanished check for related new topics as that may be it!



Ill start us off with this gem of an article highlighting the wonders of our education system:
[url=http://news.uk.msn.com/Article.aspx?cp-" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;]http://news.uk.msn.com/Article.aspx?cp-[/url] ... id=8749718
Last edited by evil cod on Thu Jul 03, 2008 2:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
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davidaiow
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Mon Jun 30, 2008 8:14 pm

"LiamSAFC" wrote:
can really push to get this sadistic mockery of a dictator out.


I thought you were referring to George Bush :oops:

Not as harrowing as Liam's story, but I think that it is a bit of a commercial outrage in a global market:
http://www.news.com.au/technology/story ... 08,00.html
Aussies paying five times more for software

not only does this happen in Australia, but also in England and any number of countries across the world. I really do think that it is unfair.
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Sam
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Tue Jul 01, 2008 6:14 pm

"davidaiow""][quote=""LiamSAFC" wrote:
can really push to get this sadistic mockery of a dictator out.


I thought you were referring to George Bush :oops:

Not as harrowing as Liam's story, but I think that it is a bit of a commercial outrage in a global market:
http://www.news.com.au/technology/story ... 08,00.html
Aussies paying five times more for software

not only does this happen in Australia, but also in England and any number of countries across the world. I really do think that it is unfair.[/quote]

Unfortunately they can charge whatever they like.

That's Capitalism for you...
 
Satch

Wed Jul 02, 2008 1:25 pm

Crazy Bulldozer Man

This sounds too bizarre to be true, but it's quite shocking, and must have been pretty scary to experience
 
Simon

Wed Jul 02, 2008 10:39 pm

God I hate the media in this country sometimes:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/blogs/nickrobinson ... attle.html

I'd just like to point out the actual text of the note, which read:

"Geoff Hoon" wrote:
Dear Keith...
Just a quick note to thank you for all your help during the period leading up to last Wednesday's vote. I wanted you to know how much I appreciated all your help.
I trust that it will be appropriately rewarded!...With thanks and best wishes,
Geoff.


Apparently, according to Cameron, the Daily Telegraph and now no end of media columnists, armchair government bashers etc. that is the proof that the government was involved in some untoward deals and bribes to push 42 through the Commons. (Obviously deals never take place in politics).

It seems that no-one has actually bothered reading the note though. In particular "thank you for all your help during the period leading up to last Wednesday's vote".

Hang on, Mr. Cameron! I thought the accusation was that the government had offered bribes for voting for 42 days. How much more abundantly clear is it that this note could have no such connotations, even if you disregarded the fact that the "suitably rewarded" comment was not a joke? I'll just clarify: helping the government in the run up to the vote means that Vaz must have always intended to vote with the government. This being the case, then no question of any shady dealings to make Vaz vote for 42 days could have taken place: it's a no-brainer, but now Brown is getting bashed around the head for it.

The Tories seem more concerned with the destruction of this government and one-upmanship than actually giving the public an alternative. This is probably because it's quite easy to do, but I fear for a public that votes a government into office (which it is clearly going to do come 2010), having no idea what they stand for, what they offer, or what they would do differently to the previous administration.
 
LiamSAFC

Thu Jul 03, 2008 1:51 pm

Completely agree there Simon.

It's a fact. The Tories will probably be in power come 2010. Labour's slumps in the polls have undermined the fact that the public want Brown out due to all the bad publicity in the Media hes been getting. Fair enough, hes an incompetent leader, especially with only 1 year into his leadership, Brown has made so many mistakes, but none so many than Thatcher herself.

The media can be so contradictory. I want Labour to stay in power, but some huge reforms will have to be made. I can't see it happening though.
 
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Liam
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Thu Jul 03, 2008 2:22 pm

You've missed one huge point though Simon that undermines your arguement. Mr. Vaz and the Home Affairs Select Comittee were previously not convinced by the 42 days arguement and then all of a sudden they were. A deal could have still been done some days before the vote. Also it is clear that other deals have been done over that issue - namely lessening sanctions on Cuba and less Post Office closures in key labour seats.

I wouldn't worry too much about Tories coming into power again. It's quite a different party from last time around. The best thing about them so far is that they've put all their policies into review and their different policy groups are starting to come up with some answers to the countries problems. The reason not many people think they have any policies yet is because they rightly don't want to define them until an election because Labour keep stealing them.

For the record I think some of the Tory policies are absolutely barmy! Opposition to airport expansion for example just isn't sensible, but I think that's an election pledge that will ultimately be overcome when in government.

It's the opposition's duty to hold the government to account Simon, and it's not their obligation to offer fully worked out alternatives until an election is launched.

That's the way the UK political system works - defence from government, attack from opposition.
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Simon

Thu Jul 03, 2008 5:19 pm

"Liam" wrote:
You've missed one huge point though Simon that undermines your argument. Mr. Vaz and the Home Affairs Select Committee were previously not convinced by the 42 days argument and then all of a sudden they were. A deal could have still been done some days before the vote. Also it is clear that other deals have been done over that issue - namely lessening sanctions on Cuba and less Post Office closures in key labour seats.


I don't believe I've missed the point. The job of the government whips is to maintain party discipline. They have, currently, and will continue to do this in a number of ways, and this includes agreeing to "look again" at issues concerning the particular MPs are their constituents. This is not a news story. The inference from Cameron was clearly that Mr. Vaz had been bribed, and the issue was that of the vote on 42 days, and not of the HASC report. Lest you, of all people, forget that the HASC is a cross-party select committee - surely Richard Benyon (Con, Newbury) might have cried foul if there had been a whitewash? This is nonsense.


"Liam" wrote:
It's the opposition's duty to hold the government to account Simon, and it's not their obligation to offer fully worked out alternatives until an election is launched.

That's the way the UK political system works - defence from government, attack from opposition.


Yes, but it might be nice to get a coherent general direction that Cameron intends to take his party. This is not forthcoming, it's just sound bite here, PR stunt there, and then this: making up issues from the most tenuous of evidence and trying to create a media circus around it. It's a sad day for politics. It seems to me that Clegg (and Cable before him) is the one that is really taking on the task of being a sensible opposition, while Cameron turns the House of Commons into a pantomime.
 
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Liam
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Thu Jul 03, 2008 7:49 pm

"Simon" wrote:
Yes, but it might be nice to get a coherent general direction that Cameron intends to take his party. This is not forthcoming, it's just sound bite here, PR stunt there, and then this: making up issues from the most tenuous of evidence and trying to create a media circus around it. It's a sad day for politics. It seems to me that Clegg (and Cable before him) is the one that is really taking on the task of being a sensible opposition, while Cameron turns the House of Commons into a pantomime.

With all due respect I've heard far more direction and vision from Cameron than Gorden Brown has ever laid out, dispite his several relaunches. That's the real worrying issue. I conceed that decisions such as Nuclear have finally been made and the Tories have been very vague about such things, but again, I believe this is more a tool of waiting for election rather than going all out 2 years before. Which is sensible politics.
I don't understand why you're making such a big thing of this though - this issue will grow mouldy for a bit and then be forgotten about - not really a sad day for politics after all of Gordon's lies is it? ("I cancelled the election because I knew I would win."
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Simon

Fri Jul 04, 2008 12:27 am

"Liam" wrote:
With all due respect I've heard far more direction and vision from Cameron than Gordon Brown has ever laid out, despite his several relaunches. That's the real worrying issue.


I think that's probably fair enough, although it doesn't excuse Cameron. There is no clear message coming out of anybody in Westminster at the moment, and this has probably not helped the (generally) rather poor view of the populace vis-à-vis politicians and the political process of modern times.

I don't understand why you're making such a big thing of this though - this issue will grow mouldy for a bit and then be forgotten about - not really a sad day for politics after all of Gordon's lies is it? ("I cancelled the election because I knew I would win."


I'm making a big deal of it because I have an aversion to ridiculous hyperbole whipped up by the media regarding anything involving this government. I genuinely think that this country would be a much more pleasant place without the constant blame culture, doom-mongering and hysteria we are bombarded with day in, day out. The economic situation, coupled with the sleaze aspect, is nowhere near as bad as it was in the early 1990s, yet anyone taking a cursory glance at the newspapers would be forgiven for thinking this was 1929. It really is beyond a joke.

It's wrong to blame Gordon Brown for everything that has happened. The guy is no schmuck, he has a firm ideology and I believe he is as great a conviction politician as you will find in parliament today. The same could have been said of John Major; another victim of circumstance. Yes, his leadership skills have been found wanting; he seems to be all at sea, but I reject categorically that he has been at all duplicitous - no more so than any politician sitting in the House. Yes, he deserves the blame for some aspects of the way the government has performed, but this sort of thing is symptomatic of the need for people to blame someone for their (as yet, generally only perceived) misfortunes.
 
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Fri Jul 04, 2008 1:20 am

http://news.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/hi/technology/newsid_7486000/7486836.stm
Interesting story, and albeit I haven't got it even though being in the top 3% of VM downloaders for quite a while, I am quite suprised they ahd the cheek to do this really. Thoughts on this anyone?
 
LiamSAFC

Fri Jul 04, 2008 1:38 am

To be honest, I am a criminal. :shock:

I do use Isohunt in order to get my music. It shouldn't be me thats the criminal however, people should be entitled to share their music onto the internet via non-downloadable means, however by simply streaming it from another server/website.

Radioblogclub has tried this, however isn't really updated that often. If we seen a website like that, I would most certainly sign up and listen to the music. I don't think I should be bullied into paying for my music however, otherwise I'd just record my songs off the radio.

Fact: Hardly anything can really be done to stop it now. Most of my mates don't buy music, and the industry has been slumping for years. It was simply a matter of time before it overtook individual record/album sales because people don't want to pay for their music anymore.
 
Moley

Fri Jul 04, 2008 2:14 am

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/manc ... 486280.stm

This has seriously sickened me, some people defy belief.
 
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Sam
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Fri Jul 04, 2008 2:18 am

This is more sickening if you ask me...

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/engl ... 487126.stm

Two French research students found stabbed to death following a flat fire had been tied up and suffered horrific, excessive injuries, police have said.

The bodies of Laurent Bonomo and Gabriel Ferez, both 23, were found in a ground-floor flat in New Cross, south-east London, on Sunday night.

They had suffered a total of 243 stab wounds to the head, neck and chest before being set alight.


O_O
 
Skumfidus

Fri Jul 04, 2008 2:28 am

Somethink does need to be done about piracy, it may well be ruining industries. Thing is, if they weren't so money grabbing in the first place, we wouldn't be at this point. If in a time of crisis, bottled water was £150 a bottle, damn right i'd nick it!

And until publishers of all kinds of digital media accept this, The Bay will be my number one bookmark, and Utorrent my number one program after Opera.
 
LiamSAFC

Fri Jul 04, 2008 12:45 pm

http://tvnews.virginmedia.com/news/?news_id=75392

Sad sad day for Emmerdale fans as the man who served the longest time in Emmerdale dies.
 
Simon

Sat Jul 05, 2008 12:07 am

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/7489457.stm

I feel no compunction in actually expressing a full on ROFL here, as Richey will confirm! (Well actually rolled on my bed, but let's not split hairs.)
 
Corkscrewed

Thu Jul 10, 2008 11:09 pm

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7499260.stm

oops. :lol: I think this shows that some things need to be checked a little better before releasing a securtiy patch :) heres a question for you: if the users couldn't access the internet, how did they install the patch? :D

:D
 
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Tue Jul 22, 2008 10:16 pm

Radovan Karadzic caught after over a decade.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/7519039.stm

This is good news and I hope he is executed for his crimes.
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MY HAND IS A DOLPHIN!!! >:O
*Honest Cint!*
 
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Sebastian
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Tue Jul 22, 2008 11:12 pm

I hope the man isn't executed, I hope they put him in a real life chokey and starve the bastard to death. I think execution would be much too much of an easy way out.

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